riannafinch:

beben-eleben:

This just shows that something once “ugly” can turn beautiful. Life changes. People change. 

Nah son, this shows chlorophyll being replaced by anthocyanins through hydrolases

riannafinch:

beben-eleben:

This just shows that something once “ugly” can turn beautiful. Life changes. People change. 

Nah son, this shows chlorophyll being replaced by anthocyanins through hydrolases

(via skifflemiss)

miasisyphus:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

Why are the Noses Broken? After excavating hundreds of sculptures, nineteenth-century archaeologists recognized that a large number of Egyptian stone statues have broken noses. Egyptologists still find mutilated statues in sealed tombs that have not been disturbed for millennia, indicating that the breakage occurred in ancient times.There are several explanations for this phenomenon. The first and most practical is that when a statue falls forward, the nose is the first point to hit the ground. But many statues show evidence of deliberate disfiguring with a hammer and chisel, a fact that highlights the religious function of Egyptian art. The ancient Egyptians believed that tomb statues could be transformed into living beings through a funerary ritual called the Opening of the Mouth Ceremony. The “living statue” then served as an eternal home for the deceased’s soul. Smashing the nose effectively “killed” the statue. A tomb robber or a person anxious to destroy the soul of a dead enemy simply broke the statue’s nose to prevent the deceased from exacting revenge.Also, certain crimes in ancient Egypt, including perjury and temple robbery, were punished by cutting off the culprit’s nose. Perhaps some of the damaged statues belonged to individuals whose crimes were discovered and punished posthumously.The most famous broken nose is probably that of the Great Sphinx at Giza. Napoleon is often blamed for destroying the nose of the Great Sphinx when he invaded Egypt in 1799. According to tradition, his artillery practiced their skills by shooting at the Sphinx’s face with a cannon. However, numerous renderings of the Sphinx made long before 1799 show it with the nose already gone. According to several medieval Arab authors, the Giza Sphinx was defaced in 1378 by a zealous adherent of Sufism named Mohammed Sa’im al-Dahr who felt that the legendary statue was sacrilegious.
http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/648/Egypt_Reborn%3A_Art_for_Eternity

People should really start actually researching things before spouting nonsense that isn’t real history. Is it really that hard to Google something?

miasisyphus:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

Why are the Noses Broken? 
After excavating hundreds of sculptures, nineteenth-century archaeologists recognized that a large number of Egyptian stone statues have broken noses. Egyptologists still find mutilated statues in sealed tombs that have not been disturbed for millennia, indicating that the breakage occurred in ancient times.

There are several explanations for this phenomenon. The first and most practical is that when a statue falls forward, the nose is the first point to hit the ground. But many statues show evidence of deliberate disfiguring with a hammer and chisel, a fact that highlights the religious function of Egyptian art. The ancient Egyptians believed that tomb statues could be transformed into living beings through a funerary ritual called the Opening of the Mouth Ceremony. The “living statue” then served as an eternal home for the deceased’s soul. Smashing the nose effectively “killed” the statue. A tomb robber or a person anxious to destroy the soul of a dead enemy simply broke the statue’s nose to prevent the deceased from exacting revenge.

Also, certain crimes in ancient Egypt, including perjury and temple robbery, were punished by cutting off the culprit’s nose. Perhaps some of the damaged statues belonged to individuals whose crimes were discovered and punished posthumously.

The most famous broken nose is probably that of the Great Sphinx at Giza. Napoleon is often blamed for destroying the nose of the Great Sphinx when he invaded Egypt in 1799. According to tradition, his artillery practiced their skills by shooting at the Sphinx’s face with a cannon. However, numerous renderings of the Sphinx made long before 1799 show it with the nose already gone. According to several medieval Arab authors, the Giza Sphinx was defaced in 1378 by a zealous adherent of Sufism named Mohammed Sa’im al-Dahr who felt that the legendary statue was sacrilegious.

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/648/Egypt_Reborn%3A_Art_for_Eternity

People should really start actually researching things before spouting nonsense that isn’t real history. Is it really that hard to Google something?

art-of-swords:

Costume Sword with Scabbard in the Classical Style

  • Dated: circa 1788–90
  • Culture: French, Paris
  • Medium: steel, wood, gesso, silver, gold leaf
  • Measurements: overall length: 31 7/8 in. / 81 cm; blade length: 23 3/8 in. / 59.3 cm; scabbard length: 24 5/8 in. / 62.5 cm; sword wight: 1.9 lbs. / 0.9 kg; scabbard weight: 0.9 lbs. / 0.4 kg; total weight: 2.8 lbs. / 1.3 kg

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

comicbookcovers:

Static #1, June 1993, cover by Denys Cowan and Jimmy Palmiotti

comicbookcovers:

Static #1, June 1993, cover by Denys Cowan and Jimmy Palmiotti